Monday, December 8, 2008

How Smaller Law Firms Should Use Court Reporting Services

It’s one thing for big, hundred-attorney law firms to keep a court reporting firm on their speed dial and give them a ring any time they need a reporter to handle a deposition or court case. But smaller firms need to be a bit more judicious about how they spend their money – especially in this troubled economy.



The following represents some helpful tips on how smaller law firms can best utilize court reporting services and help their businesses run more smoothly as a result:

Document indexing.

Sorting and indexing documents can significantly tax your resources. Using a court reporting service to not only transcribe depositions but also index and organize them by key terms and phrases can really be a time/money saver.

Video and Audio Transcriptions.
Having a paralegal perform video and audio transcriptions can take them away from client projects where they can be billed out at a much higher rate. Use a court reporting service to supply people to turn the spoken word into written documentation.

Translation Services. It would be nice to expand your target client demographic by offering more bilingual services, but chances are you don’t have the resources to hire someone full time who speaks multiple languages. Why not bring in expert translators and interpreters on an as-needed basis to perform these duties? You will generate more revenue while not raising your overhead too significantly.

Overall, court reporting services offer smaller firm a chance to offer more services without having to hire full time employees. Like general temp services, court reporters are an efficient way to get just the jobs you need done – without staff sitting around and “eating money” for the rest of the year.

For court reporters, plus a WHOLE lot more, visit www.CourtReporterNet.com. CourtReporterNet.com is the one-stop source for all your Court Reporting, videography and Transcription needs. Powered by innovative technologies, and a professional customer support staff, CourtReporterNet.com is sure to meet your complete satisfaction. The court reporters of CourtReporterNet.com are currently available in New York, California, Florida, Chicago and other areas throughout the United States.

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Economic cutbacks threaten Florida court reporters

Like every part of the country, Florida has been hit hard by recent economic struggles. Sweeping cutbacks are going on in private businesses and now the public sector as well. These cuts may finally be reaching an area once thought of as untouchable, Florida court reporters.

Two significant events have touched off the layoffs: government cutbacks affecting all sectors of state and federal judiciary systems, and the advent of inexpensive digital recording devices used to replace the human reporter element.While burning DVDs of court proceedings may work well enough, many in the field still believe that a human court reporter is the best way to go. For one thing, if someone says something unintelligible during a trial or hearing, only a human being can ask them to repeat it for the permanent record.

The Florida court reporter is by no means going the way of the Dodo however. There will always be enough depositions and arbitration hearings held in private law offices to keep these highly skilled professionals busy, especially given the litigious nature of the state of Florida.Yet the laying-off of the courts official reporters in several counties may be ushering in technology and ushering out an era as old as the court system itself.

To find a top Florida Court Reporter in your area visit http://www.courtreporternet.com/. This valuable site can help you quickly locate an outstanding reporter even on short notice.

Monday, October 27, 2008

New Jersey Court Reporters use Digital Recordings for Backup

When a New Jersey Court Reporter sits down to perform a live transcription of a court proceeding, theres a lot of pressure. They have to get every word spot on and be ready to read back the dialogue they have transcribed on the spot if requested by the judge or counsel.
Luckily, court reporters need not be the last line of defense in terms of preserving everything that is spoken in court.

Many New Jersey court reporters now use FTR or For the Reporter, a CD-based system that allows them to create a digital master of the entire trial or hearing. Generally, these recordings are sealed and stored away in case of an appeal in the trial but they still form a nice back-up for those occasions when a judge or attorney wants to hear an immediate playback of what transpired in court after the fact and doesnt have time to read through a full transcript.

Court recordings of this nature are especially vital around the holidays, because many attorneys appeal their cases right before the end of the year. With a huge volume of cases coming up for appeal, the system helps court reporters and other transcription services avoid overload.
The recordings are an important part of the technology, but just another example of why there always needs to be a human court reporter present in order to guarantee proper transcription.

With outstanding New Jersey court reporters in greater demand, it is more important ever to work with a top court reporting service. Services like the ones found at www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter even on short notice.

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Why being a New York Court Reporter is better than being a New York Attorney


Sure, it sounds like a joke, but just following our reasoning below and you’ll be reaching for the nearest transcription machine and getting your speed up to 240 words per minute.

Why it’s better to be a New York Court Reporter

Court Reporters have lower student loans. The cost of becoming a licensed and accredited New York Court Reporter is considerably lower than law school. The salary is good, and court reporter won’t spend half their lives giving half of it back to Sallie Mae!


There’s no stressful partnership track. In the dog-eat-dog Manhattan legal community, an attorney can get lost in the competition to make partner. Not so with the court reporting business. Men and women who excel at their craft are given great opportunities to grow their careers without billing 100 hours a week.

Better job security. Every year, the schools of America continue to graduate thousands of young attorneys. And when the economy gets bad, many will struggle to find a position that meets their financial needs. Currently, the opposite is true for New York court reporters. In fact, there aren’t nearly enough of them to go around, meaning that this is a career where demand far outstrips supply.

When was the last time you heard a “How many court reporters…” joke? Well, we haven’t heard one anyway. Enough said.

With outstanding New York court reports in greater demand, it is more important than ever to work with a top court reporting service. Services like the ones found at www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice.

Monday, October 20, 2008

How New York Court Reporters Stay Sharp

You’d be hard pressed to find court reporters anywhere in the United States who are more hard-wired into their local legal community that in New York. That’s because things happen FAST in Manhattan, and court reporters have to be ready for anything! Here’s a quick look at how they stay on top of their game.

1. Continued training and practice. New York court reporters are always looking to sharpen their skills and learn the latest techniques from within their industry. Many will take continuing education classes or just practice their typing speed at home to stay sharp.

2. Keeping their cell phone handy at all times. Sometimes attorneys need a court reporter on very short notice. Therefore, the ones who get the most work are those who maintain a flexible schedule and always keep their phones on.

3. Learning new languages. The demand for court reporters who speak multiple languages continues to grow in New York City and around the country. Reporters who become fluent in languages from Spanish to American Sign Language are looking at a steady stream of work in the years to come.

4. Maintaining a professional look. Finally, New York court reporters understand that there are certain expectations placed on them in terms of appearance. As such, they always stay cleanly groomed and keep at least three business suits at the ready in case of a lengthy trial.

With outstanding court reports in great demand through New York City and the rest of the Empire State, it is more important ever to work with a top court reporting service. Services like the ones found at www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice. Every court reporter at www.courtreporternet.com is hand selected for their professionalism and outstanding skill set. Visit the site today for more information!

Thursday, October 16, 2008

What a Florida Court Reporter Needs to Know

Florida is one of the most diverse legal communities in the United States. Every day a wide variety of cases – everything from drug trafficking to estate planning – pass through the court houses of Miami, Tallahassee, Tampa Bay and other major cities. But what about the Florida court reporter who provides the official record of all these proceedings? Is there anything special that they need to know in order to perform their jobs to the fullest?

Here’s a quick look at what every Florida court reporter needs to know.

* An understanding of a wide variety of cases. A Florida court reporter may be working on a deposition in a drug case one day and a court hearing for a contested will the next. Having a broad understanding of the different types of court cases will serve the reporter well.



* Be bilingual. Especially in Dade County, where there is a large Hispanic population, it is a good idea to know Spanish as a means for getting more court reporting work.

* How to be professional. Most importantly, those court reporters who appear on time and always handle themselves in a highly professional manner will get the most work, no matter what part of Florida they live in.

* To be ready on short notice. Many court reporting agencies offer their reporters out for hire on very short notice. That means Florida court reporters must be ready to put their “game face” on in a matter of just hours.

Your business needs top court reporters. To work with a top court reporting service in your area, visit www.court-reporter.net today!

Friday, October 10, 2008

How to get the most out of your court reporting agency

So you’ve got an upcoming court case or deposition and need a certified, top-flight court reporter to transcribe the event. Contacting a court reporting agency is the fastest, easiest way to get the professional help you need to handle the job.

The following are some helpful tips to help you get the most out of the court reporting agency you choose.



* Explain the specifics of the job. The easiest way to insure that you get the right person for the job from your court reporting agency is to explain, in detail, everything the job entails. This way, the court reporting agency can search all their available employees for the right reporter with the ideal background. Remember, the more specific you can be the better!

* Call in advance. While most court reporting agencies can send you someone on short notice, there may be a premium on the last-minute service, and the selection of court reporters will always be better the longer the lead time you give the agency.

* Ask for references. If you feel unsure about working with a court reporting agency for the first time, ask the company for professional references. Reputable agencies will have no problem providing you with this information.

* Provide accurate information. Make sure that the court reporting agency knows the exact address of where the meeting or hearing will take place, and the specific time it will begin. This will help the court reporter get there on time, and greatly reduce the chance that the proceedings will be held up because of a tardy reporter.

Your business needs top court reporters. To work with a top court reporting service in your area, visit www.courtreporternet.com today!

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Court reporting agencies less impacted by the economic crisis

While few Americans (save the 1% of the population that is the wealthiest) will go unscathed through the current economic crisis, court reporters should breathe a little easier than most. The fact is that although times are tough, court reporting agencies remain busy. Why? Consider the following facts.

* People are still litigious. The residents of the United States continue to sue one another at a higher and higher rate each year – regardless of the economy. This represents steady work, and increased demand for court reporters.

* Court reporters can’t be laid off. If there’s a court case, you are going to need court reporters. If times are tough, a law firm may cut back on the donuts and coffee, but they will always need someone to provide a transcribed, official record of events.



* Demand for court reporters still far outstrips the supply. Even if there were a slowdown in the legal field, there are still barely enough court reporters to go around, making the industry recession-proof for at least the foreseeable future.

The economic downturn doesn’t benefit anyone in America – but that doesn’t mean some people won’t make it through better than others. Put court reporters on the favorable side of that coin.

With outstanding court reports in greater demand, it is more important ever to work with a top court reporting service. Services like the ones found at www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice.

Friday, October 3, 2008

Five things a court reporter can do better than you

We all look at certain jobs and sniff, “heck, I could do that!” But when you consider everything a court reporter is able to accomplish while on the job, you may have to rethink that position of superiority.



To plead the case, here are five things a court reporter can do better than you!

#1 They type faster - Sure, it may be on those strange looking steno machines, but qualified court reporters can still torch the competition by reaching speeds of over 200 words per minute. Try topping that on your next company-wide memo.

#2 They’re more accurate – Not only do court reporters reach blazing speeds, they do it while rarely making mistakes. We hit the backspace button approximately 145 times while writing this blog entry. A court reporter would have pulled it off flawlessly on the first pass.

#3 They focus better – You can’t type a one page thank you letter without checking your email and updating your Facebook status twice. Court reporters know that they have a job to do and never let any distraction in the court room or the deposition room distract them from that task.

#4 They dress better than you – Court reporters always look sharp. Appearing in front of judges and high-powered attorneys all day, it’s an absolute must! Have you checked to see if your shoes match your belt today?

#5 They worry less about their job security – Court reporters are in demand. A slowdown in the number of people attending court reporting school (coupled with the rise in court cases) has made this a fantastic time to become a court reporter. Court reporters enjoy flexible working hours and lucrative salaries.

For the best court reporters around the country, visit www.CourtReporterNet.com. CourtReporterNet.com is the one-stop source for all your Court Reporting, videography and Transcription needs. Powered by innovative technologies, and a professional customer support staff, CourtReporterNet.com is sure to meet your complete satisfaction.

Monday, September 29, 2008

The top 7 best states to be a court reporter

The United States is one of the most litigious countries in the world. Every day, millions of Americans bring legal action against their fellow citizens, and while it might not be good for them, court reporters have reaped the benefits of all these court cases.


Yes, court reporters are in demand now more than ever, but some states feature more opportunities than others. The following is a list of the best states for court reporters in terms of the demand for their services (cost of living, quality of life and other issues have not been included in this discussion).

The seven best states to be a court reporter

1. California – The biggest state in the country is also the most litigious. Court reporters in California are always in demand around the major urban centers of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Sacramento and San Diego and the countless small towns in between.

2. Florida – With its huge elderly population, Florida is also home to countless disputes over the estates of its deceased residents. That means there will be a call for court reporters to record depositions and court hearings regarding will, trusts and other estate planning matters.

3. New York – Inside New York State you’ll find Manhattan, and in Manhattan you will find the
most vibrant legal community in the world. Court reporters in New York can take on more work in the course of a day because of the physical proximity of all the law offices in Manhattan.

4. Illinois – Not much going on in Illinois…oh, except for Chicago – home to some of the most well-regarded legal minds in the country. Chicago court reporters may be called to work on Federal cases as well as those regarding the byzantine, always colorful local political scene.

5. Texas – Texas court reporters may find themselves working on a wide variety of case types
on any given day. The Lone Star State is home to immigration cases, large corporate anti-trust suits and even narcotics-related cases stemming the activity of drug cartels operating across the border in Mexico.

6. Nevada – The fastest growing state in the U.S., Nevada is a good place for a court reporter to set up shop. Because the population growth is such a recent occurrence, there is a chance for a court reporter to establish a comprehensive “network” as a trusted source on Nevada legal proceedings (as they pertain to court reporting and the filing of legal documents).

7. Louisiana – With Hurricane Katrina came a bevy of legal proceedings. Although it has been two years since the storm, there will likely be enough litigation in the New Orleans area alone to last for many years. Since many skilled professionals left the area after the Great Storm, there is a high demand for court reporters in the area.

For the best court reporters around the country, visit www.CourtReporterNet.com. CourtReporterNet.com is the one-stop source for all your Court Reporting, videography and Transcription needs. Powered by innovative technologies, and a professional customer support staff, CourtReporterNet.com is sure to meet your complete satisfaction. The court reporters of CourtReporterNet.com are currently available in New York, California, Florida, Chicago and other areas throughout the United States.

Questions to ask if you’re considering a school for court reporters

Not all court reporting schools are created equal. Some are better equipped to help budding court reporters enter the competitive job market than others. But how do you know the difference between a top flight school for court reporters and a fly by night operation?

Here are five simple questions every prospective student should ask about their potential
training program.



1. What are the job placement rates? Ask about how many students have been placed into court reporting jobs in the past year or two.

2. How many students graduate from the program? Want to know if a program is worth taking? Simply ask about graduation rates and you’ll get your answer. If 90% or more people stuck it out until the end, you know there’s some value there.

3. Do the instructors have experience? You want to be taught by people who know the industry best, so always look for programs taught by people who are in the front lines of the court reporting business right now.

4. Do you have to bring your own steno machine? It may sound silly, but this is a perfectly legitimate question to ask up front. Steno machines are expensive, and eventually you will have to buy one if you pursue a career in court reporting, but many schools supply the device to its students for use in the coursework.

5. May I speak to some alumni? Graduates of the program are going to give you a more unbiased opinion about the school and whether or not it is worth investing in. Ask for an Alumni Guide, or access to some names and phone numbers of those who have completed the program.

For the best court reporters around the country, visit www.CourtReporterNet.com. CourtReporterNet.com is the one-stop source for all your Court Reporting, videography and Transcription needs. Powered by innovative technologies, and a professional customer support staff, CourtReporterNet.com is sure to meet your complete satisfaction. The court reporters of CourtReporterNet.com are currently available in New York, California, Florida, Chicago and other areas throughout the United States.

Monday, September 22, 2008

Court reporting and the deposition


While many people believe that the bulk of court reporting takes place inside an actual court house, the reality is that court reports spend an overwhelming proportion of their time in law offices and meeting rooms working on depositions.

Depositions are a crucial part of the legal process and are used to create a written record of the testimony of key parties involved in a case. Depositions are generally taken for one of two reasons: either because the witness is unable to appear in court or to create a written record of that witness’ testimony which will later be corroborated against their live appearance in court.

In either case, creating a completely accurate record of the deposition testimony is an essential component of the case. And that is why professional court reporting is such an important part of the process.

Court reporting during a deposition requires an uncommon mixture of speed (individuals will be talking at normal conversational rates, or higher if nervous) and accuracy (the record created at the deposition will be used by the court as a verbatim recreation of that testimony).

Unlike a court room, court reporters must become accustomed to strange surroundings very quickly. The office in which the deposition is taken may be hot, cramped or just generally uncomfortable, but the court reporter must still provide the same top-tier service to their client.

The increasingly litigious state of our country has placed greater demands on trained and certified court reporters to work these depositions in civil cases and criminal cases as well.

If you have an upcoming deposition, your business needs to work with a top court reporting service in your area. The website www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice.

Monday, September 15, 2008

Five great reasons to become a court reporter



This decade has been a good one for court reporters. The job is in demand and shows no signs of slowing down in the next decade. Relatively unaffected by the economy, court reporting is a great choice for the reasons that follow:

1. You will be in demand. Currently there is a significant demand for court reporters all around the country. Simply put, there’s more work than ever for a professionally trained court reporter – which makes this an excellent career choice in this difficult job market.

2. You will make good money. Employment data shows that court reporters earn an average of $65,000 - $70,000 per year.

3. This is an exciting job. Court reporters are given a chance to meet new and interesting people, and take part in legal cases that can change lives as well as our society as a whole. Few positions offer this kind of “front line” access to the fascinating comings and goings inside the legal system.

4. This is a chance to learn about the law. Anyone who is considering going to law school, or working in other areas of the legal community can benefit from being a court reporter. For those who are observant and learn by watching, the position offers a chance to excel in other areas of the business.

5. It is a job with stability. Court reporters cannot be replaced by computers. There is just too much of a human element involved. Also, it is a job that would be difficult to outsource to other countries due to the language requirements of the job.

Your business needs top court reporters. To work with a top court reporting service in your area, visit www.court-reporter.net today!

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Texas court reporter on the receiving end of an unwanted kiss


It happened in the 249th District courtroom of the Fort Worth, Texas judiciary system. Longtime court reporter LuAnn Gill was transcribing a case when she became distracted by Jerry Loftin, one of the courtroom attorneys, who was making unwanted noise that was making it difficult to do her job.

According to witnesses, Gill tapped Loftin on the shoulder and asked him to quiet down. Then, Loftin alleged bent down to thank Gill for being so conscientious and planted a kiss on her cheek.
Loftin denies it, but now finds himself in all kinds of trouble with the Texas Bar Association and the Johnson Court System, which recently charged the Fort Worth attorney with assault by offensive contact, a Class C misdemeanor that carries a maximum $500 fine.

His story sounds a bit shaky, "I didn’t really kiss her," he said. "She said I patted her on the back and kissed her cheek. I reached down and blew her a kiss — well, I was next to her cheek."
Regardless of the positioning of the kiss, the case is going to put a wrinkle in the veteran attorney’s career. As for the court reporter, she is taking the matter more seriously, "There is another side of this. He just doesn’t want anyone to hear it," Gill said. "The facts will be presented in court and you can hear what I have to say then."

The case is a rare instance where the court reporter is placed into the spotlight. The goal of any good court reporter is to remain behind the scenes – and focus solely on creating an accurate, impartial record of the events in court or during any peripheral legal proceedings.

Your business needs top court reporters. To work with a top court reporting service in your area, visit www.courtreporternet.com today!

Monday, September 8, 2008

Things you might not know that a court reporters can transcribe


While everyone who has ever watched television knows that court reporters can transcribe what is being said during a courtroom trial, fewer people know about all the other functions that these valuable, skilled individuals can handle with ease.

Did you know that court reporters can transcribe the following?

· Depositions - The lion’s share of the court reporter’s time will be spent recording these testimonies of individuals who cannot appear in court or will need to have their in-court statements corroborated at a later date.

· Arbitration hearings – Two parties engaged in arbitration are going to want a complete written record of everything that was said as the two sides reached their agreement.

· Sales meetings - Companies often need to record the words used to “fire up the troops” for future sales meetings, or as an education tool for the next generation of salespeople

· Corporate events and functions –Annual stockholder meetings and company-wide get-togethers both can benefit from having a court reporter present.

· Closed-captioning – One of the fastest growing areas for court reporters. Television shows, live productions and other media all need fast transcribers to bring the message to the hearing-impaired as soon as it is spoken.

· Webinars – A court reporter in Omaha, Nebraska can transcribe a meeting in Los Angeles and New York if that corporate gathering is held online. Just like traditional meetings, the reporter records everything that is being said, and provides a comprehensive written documentation of the proceedings, via email, to all appropriate parties.

· Public gatherings – A court reporter can be used to transcribe anything from town hall meetings to church services.

With so many valuable uses for court reporters, your business needs to work with a top court reporting service in your area. Services like the ones found at www.courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice.

Sunday, September 7, 2008

Court reporters more in demand than ever

Court reporters play a crucial role in the legal system. They are the official record bearers of all court proceedings, depositions, hearing and other official meetings. And with a country that is more litigious than ever before, one would have to believe that more and more individuals are entering the court reporting field.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Recently, the National Court Reporting Association reported that their ranks had thinned in recent years. For evidence, they pointed to several key statistics:

· There are now only 130 schools across the United States that offer classes in court reporting – down significantly from the late 20th century

· The number of court reporters registered with the NCRA is down to 23,000 – the lowest levels in two decades.

· Perception of the job is constantly referred to as “old fashioned” and “out of date” by those surveyed.

What is odd about these numbers is that the average court reporter earns almost $70,000 dollars per year and enjoys a tremendous amount of flexibility in their hours. They also work with the latest technologies and gain entrĂ©e in the legal profession that even most law students can’t claim to have.

For those wondering about the longevity of this career choice, they need look no further than the case of Margaret Wasmund, an award-winning court reporter who has built a stable, rewarding career in the business. Wasmund echoed the call of many in the legal profession when she said, “we do need more reporters and I think there are fewer than there once was. I just don't know where they are!”

With outstanding court reports in greater demand, it is more important ever to work with a top court reporting service. Services like the ones found at courtreporternet.com can help you locate an outstanding reporter – even on short notice.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Thursday, July 3, 2008

COCRA Message to Members and Friends

Iowa Court Reporters Association Convention

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